Winchester Model 70 Troubleshooting

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PostPosted: Wed Apr 06, 2011 11:07 am
Any issues, concerns or problems you may have with your Winchester Model 70; this is a thread for troubleshooting.
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 06, 2011 4:36 pm
Adjusting the Winchester Model 70 Trigger
http://www.varminthunters.com/tech/win70trigger.html
Let me discuss how the trigger on the Model 70 works. Knowing how it works will allow you to know how a gunsmith would
adjust it.

The trigger mechanism on the Winchester Model 70 is remarkably simple. Remove the barreled acton of a Model 70 from
it's stock and you can see just how simple it is. You will see a trigger that pivots on a pin. Look at the rear portion of the trigger
(normally hidden by the stock) and you will see a square head screw (the trigger stop screw), three nuts, and a spring (we'll call it
the trigger return spring).

The purpose of the trigger stop screw is to limit the amount of over travel of the trigger. It is possible to screw the trigger stop
screw in far enough that you will not be able to pull the trigger enough to release the sear. Ideally the trigger stop screw should
be screwed in as far as it can and still have enough trigger movement to reliably release the sear. This will allow for the greatest
amount of adjustment of the trigger spring tension.

Tension on the trigger return spring determines a majority of the trigger pull weight (the rest of the trigger pull weight comes
from the friction between the trigger and the sear). The spring surrounds the trigger stop screw, both can be seen just behind
the trigger. The trigger stop screw is held in place by a pair of captive nuts, one on each side of the part of the trigger the stop
screw passes through. A third nut sets the tension on the trigger spring. Tightening this third nut (turning it clockwise) against the
trigger spring will increase the trigger pull. And turning it counter clockwise will decrease the trigger pull weight.

After making any adjustments, be absolutely sure to test for an excessively light trigger. To do this, screw the barreled action
back in the stock. With the bolt cocked, in the closed position on an empty chamber, and the safety off, butt down the rifle. That
is hold the rifle barrel pointing upward, let the butt bounce on the ground. It should take a considerable bump to cause the firing pin
to drop (on the empty chamber).

On a friend's pre-64 Model 70 trigger, the spring had to be changed because enough of the trigger spring pretension could not
be removed to get an acceptable trigger pull weight. Yet on another (on one of those new classic actions), it was possible to
remove ALL of the trigger spring pretension. This is a dangerous situation because only the trigger to sear tension keeps the
cocked rifle from firing.

Well I hope you now have a better understanding of how a Model 70 trigger works. Of course for all trigger pull weight
adjustments you should take your rifle to a reputable gunsmith.
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.410
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Location: Melbourne Victoria, Australia
PostPosted: Tue Jan 22, 2013 7:33 pm
Thanks for your post mate, very useful.

Cheers

Jorge
“The Germans brought the best hunting rifle to the war. The Americans brought the best target rifle. The British brought the best battle rifle!”

Copper BB
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 29, 2013 3:13 am
Thanks for that, really informative.
Of course, the newest and latest model 70 has a slightly new mechanism, the MOA trigger. I guess the adjustment is a little different?
Cheers.

Copper BB
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Joined: Sun Apr 28, 2013 1:30 pm
PostPosted: Sun Apr 28, 2013 11:58 pm
I have a grouping problem. All screws are tight. Using factory Remington core lock ammo. Have adjusted the trigger myself, could this have caused a grouping problem. Grouping is 2" @ 100 yd

Edit
Seems like the action screws are sensitive to specific torque, especially the centre one. Think this is the problem

Went to the range with centre bolt very loose and the problem is sorted. Less than 1" grouping

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD

Copper BB
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PostPosted: Fri Jan 17, 2014 8:45 pm
I purchased a Model 70 XTR that I think was manfactured inbetween 1981-1984. It is chambered in a 7x57 Mauser. It shoots well and it very accurate but not until after I had shot did I notice that the bolt on my rifle rests when locked and ready to shoot at a very high angle. I have attached photos for you to observe. I am not a gunsmith and have a intermediate to beginner level of knowledge of firearm technology. I am curious to get input on to the reason the bolt sits so high. When I compare my rifle to photos of other model 70s from the same era my blot looks like it sits incorrectly. Has anyone seen this before? Is it normal? Is is abnormal? What do I do? Can I get a new bolt?
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Copper BB
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 12, 2016 6:08 pm
I purchased an Winchester Model 70 Extreme Weather back in 2013. Never shot it live fire. Finally, today I got around to getting a scope and mounting it. I then took out the manual and went to cycle the bolt, learn the safety mechanism etc. The safety is stuck in the fire position and although I can push the bolt forward and down enough to cock the firing pin, I cannot get the bolt handle into the full down position. I have not disassembled the bolt but have removed it from the receiver, although with the safety in the fire position. I can dry fire and the firing pin releases when the trigger is pressed.

Is this a common problem? I find this unusual for a firearm which is basically out of the box.

Copper BB
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 14, 2016 1:55 pm
m0ll0y wrote:I purchased a Model 70 XTR that I think was manfactured inbetween 1981-1984. It is chambered in a 7x57 Mauser. It shoots well and it very accurate but not until after I had shot did I notice that the bolt on my rifle rests when locked and ready to shoot at a very high angle. I have attached photos for you to observe. I am not a gunsmith and have a intermediate to beginner level of knowledge of firearm technology. I am curious to get input on to the reason the bolt sits so high. When I compare my rifle to photos of other model 70s from the same era my blot looks like it sits incorrectly. Has anyone seen this before? Is it normal? Is is abnormal? What do I do? Can I get a new bolt?

That is not correct positioning. Need to get it checked to see if the bolt is burred or has something blocking the mechanism or if the entire bolt needs replacing.

Copper BB
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 17, 2016 5:30 pm
m0ll0y, You could loosen the front action screw a few turns and check if the bolts closes again. It may be that screw is just too long and interfering with the bolt lug.

.270 WIN
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 17, 2016 10:49 pm
Wilderness 1864, I would suggest a telephone call to Winchester before firing that rifle!
Too old to be nice, never too old to learn!

.270 WIN
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PostPosted: Mon Jan 18, 2016 10:53 am
Those scope block screws aren't too long are they? I agree with the previous action screw tension suggestion as well..

44

Copper BB
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PostPosted: Tue Feb 02, 2016 7:30 am
bob lewis wrote:Wilderness 1864, I would suggest a telephone call to Winchester before firing that rifle!


Called Winchester and they just said to ship it back. Went to a gunsmith before just shipping in back. It might have been something simple, and it was. Problem resolved.

Call this one "operator error". Gunsmith was able to tell just by moving the bolt forward. When I mounted my scope, I mixed up one of the rear base screws with a front base screw. The rear screws are a bit longer but the threading is the same. The longer misplaced screw protruded into the receiver and stopped the bolt from going all the way forward. Swapped the screws and everything works just fine.

Can't say I am proud of that gaff, but I thought I would post my mea culpa here so that other readers are aware of what happened to me and can be careful to check that when mounting a scope to avoid a similar problem. Will be test firing and sighting in later this week.

Thanks for your reply.
PostPosted: Tue Feb 02, 2016 12:53 pm
Happens to the best of us...at least the "problem" is resolved...
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.410
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Location: Cocoa, FL
PostPosted: Thu Mar 03, 2016 3:03 pm
I have a post 1968 Model 70 Classic Featherweight and for whatever brain fart reason, purchased an SA XTR stock for it, which doesn't fit. I didn't know and didn't ask enougn questions of the seller. Go figure. I will regretably be selling the ever-so-nice SA stock and looking for the RIGHT one the next time. What should I be looking for?
If it was easy, anybody could do it.

.270 WIN
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Location: Northern California
PostPosted: Tue Mar 08, 2016 12:07 am
Wilderness, very glad that it worked out so well for you also that you were man enough to explain the problem. Well done!
Too old to be nice, never too old to learn!

Copper BB
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PostPosted: Mon Mar 12, 2018 8:55 pm
Hi all, new to the site. What brings me here is an issue with my model 70 270wsm. It is somewhere around 15 years old and was originally one of the black shadow models. I recently replaced the stock with a bell and carlson with full bedding block, added bottom metal to get rid of the blind magazine, and put Talley lightweights and a Leupold vx3i on it. My groups are terrible now when shooting out of a rest on a bench. Any suggestions where I should start troubleshooting?

.410
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Joined: Tue Mar 06, 2018 11:49 am
PostPosted: Fri Mar 16, 2018 10:15 am
Somewhere in your restocking the pressure on the barrel, etc., went wrong. I had Ultimate Shadow. It was in .243.it shot under MOA with the synthetic original stock on the stainless steel barrel and action. Finally put a Boyd Black laminate pararie Hunter replacement stock. Had to make no changes at all on this finished stock. Then I blueprinted it, glass bedded the tang area and just arround the barrel block. It looked great.Shooting it was amazing as now it is usually 1/2 MOA with a Caldwell Lead Sled. It doesn’t seem to care what ammo either. I measured the barrel free float and it is absolutely perfect. I think if you can find out what is rubbing on the barrel, etc., you can straighten out your rifle. I chose the .243 by the way since I find, like the 6.5 Creedmore, they are inherently quite accurate. Your rilfe has a good stock now, but the barrel has got to be properly bedded and free floated. I chose Not to use Pilar bedding on a
Laminate stock as it is usualiy umneccessary.

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